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20130801
20130831
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
was not mentioned. even though in mississippi where i was working, only 3% of the black people were registered. 40% of the population and incidentally, because of our work and working with other people, mississippi had the largest number of elected officials, but now, we're here 50 years later and we find in washington that more than in 1953. more people out of work, but more importantly, we went free in 1963. we need state hood. state hood. >> better jobs, better pay was an objective in 1963. a long time before voting rights legislation would come about, but many are crediting the march to having to expedite that, so what are you hoping comes after this 50-year mark of this march? the march did sort of spur us on and lighten our spirit, but we went to work the next week in mississippi and alabama and georgia, et cetera, so what i hope this march will do is let us know the struggle is not over. there's still massive discrimination, unemployment, gaps between the white and black students and it would spur us on to stop being so complacent, but from my point in washington, state hood is my number on
and particularly the right to vote to people of color in mississippi. i hadn't -- i didn't know him well but i had covered him on a fairly regular basis. and when he was assassinated in an especially cowardly and despicable way, i was tipped to the shooting and we were the first people covering it, news people at the scene. so i knew medgar and had met his family before. i had met his brother at the airport and we formed a bond which lasts to this day, i'm happy to say. i've always had a bond with medgar's family partly because i know firsthand, i bore witness to how heroic his efforts were to bring freedom and justice in the darkest corners of mississippi at a bad time. by the way, it's little noted nor very often remembered that the march on washington for which dr. king rightly became so famous was originally designed to be primarily a march in memory of medgar evers and what had happened to medgar evers. that got lost in the shuffle of the day as it developed and has been lost in the history and reporting since that time. >> well, dan rather, you have provided so much detail and illumination a
mississippi on sunday turning roads into rivers. flooding has not been this bad since hurricane katrina in 2005. >>> in england, outrage grows after the partner of newspaper reporter glenn greenwald is detained under a uk terrorism act. david miranda was released after nine hours of questioning. this is according to "guardian" newspaper. no charges were filed but cell phone and other items were confiscated. greenwald works for the guardian newspaper and broke the story of the secret surveillance programs in the united states. >>> in other news, a new week of trading on wall street and stocks are expected to open flat. investors take a breath following two weeks of losses. ringing the opening bell this morning, representatives from american corporate profits. there they are, just about to ring the bell. >>> one-on-one with the future king. prince william sat down with max foster opening up about parenthood for the first time since the birth of his son, george. of course, the prince talked about that moment he walked out of the hospital with his wife and his son to that incredible media f
of the -- and i came up from mississippi where i had been working with the student nonviolent coordination committee in the mississippi delta, and i was standing right up there near the lincoln statue where the people are gathered all on the steps then. i guess post 9/11, you can't have them so close, and i remember that the best view was not when i would come down and look up. the best view was when i would look out and see that the march, which had a lot of doubt hanging over it, would people really come, because there had never been a mass march on washington before for any cause. would they come? how would they be received and here, i could not see the end of the people. march by any measure had been a success, more people for any cause had gathered on this space 50 years ago. >> we thank you for taking the time now to help us remember that day 50 years ago and educate many of us who don't remember it, but know of its power in the history books. thanks so much. our live coverage of the march in washington continues next hour. former d.c. mayor, marian berry, will be joining us live. he
on the context of the time in which you were raised. i was raised in the '60s and -- >> in mississippi. >> yeah, and i'm a -- not only that a student of my history. i've said this many times, it's not a part of who i am to use that word, i understand why other people do. it's impossible for me to do it because i know the history, and i know that for so many of my relatives whom i don't know, who i don't know by name, people i'm connected to, my ancestors, that was the last word they heard as they were being strung up by a tree. that was the last sense of degradation that they experienced as, you know, some harm was caused to them. i just -- it's just not a part of the fabric of who i am. so out of respect to those who've come before and the price that they paid to rid themselves of being relegated to that word, i just don't use it. >> i understand lee daniels said that he used to use the word, and you two had a discussion -- >> i said lee, you ain't going to be using that word around me. lee, no you're not going to use that word around me. and i think it's used appropriately in the film. i mean
rescues along the beach. the choppy surf driven by the winds. >>> southern mississippi is drying up after almost six inches of rain fell in two hours. cars stuck and fire crews having to come out to help all the people. officials there handed out stand bags to protect the homes at risk of being inundated with the water. >>> can you imagine this? people went to church. by the time they left, the parking lot was full. some of they had waded out to their cars. the water did eventually go down and they were able to head home. >> good gracious, this is incredible. not that we are blaming you, but we are looking for explanations. >> this is incredible. at this point, month after month. we started this trend of drenching the southeast in june. july, setting records. it is august and we are still talking about an incredible amount of tropical moisture. the influx into the south. you can see, this is the area we are watching. each day, that moisture got closer. combined with a stationary front, they brought together unbelievable amounts of rainfall. i want to show you how far over the average, alo
't rainfall amounts in the mid atlantic and parts of the lower mississippi valley and even to the plains. that includes oklahoma city. that cold front is going to bring a nice change out there. the cold air is dipping in from the north. that means temperatures for some parts are going to run-about 10 degrees below average. you will say, is ill really still august? temperatures in the 70s. yes. that's what we're expect, tuesday, wednesday, once that front passes, typically temperatures in throw 80s an parts of the south as well. >> it's good for the kids. the kids won't feel so bad about starting school now. >> yes, they will. i feel bad for them. >> come on! be excited about school, kids. >>> in the meantime if you look up in certain parts, you will see a meteor shower, tell us about that. >> these are images from last year. we're talking the peak viewing is tonight as well as tomorrow. these are the images and you're looking at the meteors and the debris. once that starts to hit the atmosphere, that's when you start to see it trailing and burning up. when they hit the earth they move at
are up from the gulf coast and florida panhandle all the way into south carolina. gulfport, mississippi, the floodwaters receding there but with more rain in the forecast they may rise yet again. tracking it all for us is chad myers. what do you have? >> anderson, when you have a stationary front, like a stationary bike, things don't move. these storms aren't going anywhere. so what is raining now was raining an hour ago and what was raining this weekend is pretty much still raining at this point. look at these five-day rainfall totals. that is a beach. not much of a beach vacation. panama city, popular place, ten inches of rainfall over the weekend. everywhere that you see red, that's six inches. at purple higher than that, and the ten-inch bulls eyes, macon, georgia, has 24 more inches on ground than they should have. so when it rains, it floods. there's no place for the water to soak in. it's been like that for days and days and days and the rain continues. there are very few happy people in atlanta thinking can i go to a baseball game? it's raining every day, literally, anderson. >>
traveled to mississippi where marijuana is illegal, but here on the campus of one of the country's oldest universities, ole miss, a huge stash of marijuana is under lock and key. >> this is our vault. >> this is some pretty tight security. look at this door. >> mahmoud runs what's called a marijuana potency project. what's the potency of this? >> this is about 8%. >> for three decades now his team has analyzed weed confiscated from drug busts. >> this is 36% thc. you can smell it. it has a good aromatic smell. >> how much is this worry you, 36% thc confiscated? >> very dangerous material. for someone that is not experienced in marijuana smoking takes some of this, and they're going to go into the negative effects of the high, the psychosis, the irritation, irritability, paranoia, all of this. >> while not all the plants are this high, there's no question he has seen a trend. in 1972 the average potency was less than 1% thc. now it's nearly 13%. >> are people becoming more obsessed with high thc marijuana? >> i think so. they're starting out with a half a percent and 1%, and they get a goo
will show you pictures, this is gulfport, mississippi. six inches of rain fell alone there yesterday. you can see flooding the streets, stranding so many drivers. flood watches and warnings are in place all the way from the florida panhandle northward to the carolinas. people trying to leave a church in gulfport either had to wade through the waist-deep water or wait for it to recede. south florida, rip currents very, very dangerous. police report 50 rescues. in fact, an elderly couple drowned. >>> families are being told to get out as this incredibly dangerous wildfire scorches the community of sun valley, idaho. the fire has grown to more than 100,000 acres. much of this part of the country home to a lot of pricey property. you have actor tom hanks, bruce willis, they have places there. then the fire crews, 1200 firefighters working tirelessly to gain ground on the flames, trying to save the thousands of homes still in this fire's path. academy award winning actor richard dreyfuss is among those expressing gratitude to the fire crews. this was his tweet. the beaver creek fire is ravagin
already hard hit areas. gulfport, mississippi, slammed with more than a foot of rain leaving a church parking lot flooded out following sunday services. >>> olympic sprinter oscar pistorius charged with preita premeditated death. he was indicted on what would have been reeva steenkamp's 30th birthday. his trial scheduled to begin next year. >>> hosni mubarak has been acquitted in one case against him and remains in custody facing his most serious charge related to the deadly crackdown this spring. putting the u.s. and europe in the difficult position of reevaluating aid. >>> army private bradley manning could learn today just how much time he will spend in prison for leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents to wikileaks. faces a maximum sentence of 90 years and manning apologized for his actions and for hurting the united states. a military judge could announce her decision as early as today. >>> critics of bob filner hitting the streets of san diego to collect 101 signatures. trying to recall their embattled mayor. 16 women now accuse filner of sexual harassment. later t
above mississippi. >>> and apple co-founder steve wozniak offering his review of "jobs" with ashton kutchers ahis former partner. steve likes ashton better in "that '70s show" let's just say. >>> futures lower after the longest losing streak since december for stocks. the dow down for four consecutive trading days losing 440 points. >>> the irs sent out letters to 20,000 small business owners over the past year notifying them of possible income underreporting. the irs thinks businesses that get most of their sales through credit cards may be underreporting their cash transactions. cnn money has a list of places where homes are the most affordable and your income goes the farthest. top, altemon springs, florida. >> we norman hat tan. we had red flag warnings in the area, talking about strong winds and dry lightning, eventually we'll get more moisture and see rain hit the ground and that will bring relief toward the second half of the week but it will take some time. >>> rain, way too much of it, in the southeast, one to two inches of rain still possible, three to four inches possible
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)